Disappointing inflight WiFi could soon become a thing of the past

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@TheRealDanny

THE GOAT IN 5G
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The whole concept of in-flight Wi-Fi is a relatively recent phenomena. Boeing offered the service in 2001, Airbus in 2005 and more recently GoGo in 2008.

When it was introduced the concept was formed with low bandwidth in mind meaning each flight could only offer speeds not too much faster than dial up.

Then came ground based systems that offered slow 3G like speeds. But besides being slow this service only worked while the airplane was over land meaning that sea bound flights were out of luck.

Disappointed customers are demanding faster service but the industry couldn't keep up with demand. Unlike smartphones that are designed to be upgraded often in-flight systems were built to last a decade or more so thus more of the same year after year.

But there is hope. According to Honeywell, its GX Aviation system can achieve speeds of up to 50 Mbps, ViaSat's Exede can deliver up to 12 Mbps passengers while Gogo's 2Ku service promises 15 Mbps of speed.

Finally we're going to be able to use our data in-flight the way we expect to use it.




Read more: https://www.businessinsider.com/how-airplane-wifi-works-2018-9
 
Nice but that's only 12-50Mbps for the whole plane, not much bandwith when shared.
Plus they still make you pay even in buisness and 1st class, and the prices are a joke.
 
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Nice but that's only 12-50Mbps for the whole plane, not much bandwith when shared.
Plus they still make you pay even in buisness and 1st class, and the prices are a joke.

For me at least, this could be enough... Being used to the coverage up in Ontario Canada, anything above 1Mbps is actually quite usable for nearly anything aside from large downloads.

1 Mbps, you can read the news, fetch email, list to music and even browse and watch youtube at 480p.
 
That is good news from Honeywell. I wonder what the WiFi per person usage percentage is on each domestic flight? ... international flight? I suspect that it is low - maybe 25% - any public data available? I thought the speeds were acceptable except VPN and maybe streaming.

Would the new/evolving Starlink be an benefit or option for airliners and passengers? (Starlink 2020
Starlink is a division of SpaceX).
 
That is good news from Honeywell. I wonder what the WiFi per person usage percentage is on each domestic flight? ... international flight? I suspect that it is low - maybe 25% - any public data available? I thought the speeds were acceptable except VPN and maybe streaming.

Would the new/evolving Starlink be an benefit or option for airliners and passengers? (Starlink 2020
Starlink is a division of SpaceX).

Starlink has done a test/demo with the military on their airplanes. The military reportedly is very interested.

Military and civilian airplane use could be a possibility in the future. Starlink is not currently licensed for mobile airplane service. They would also have to get inter-satellite comms working for use over oceans. The signal has to get back to terrestrial ground stations at some point to connect to backbone networks.
 
I don't know if StarLink was designed to connect to something moving at 600+ mph. Probably was. That's a small fraction on the satellites' speed.
 
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I don't know if StarLink was designed to connect to something moving at 600+ mph. Probably was. That's a small fraction on the satellites' speed.
Yes an airplane at 600 mph is practically nothing compared to the satellite at ~20,000.

The phased array antenna tracks the satellites electronically.

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