What will remove hardened case residue from a phone?

Relztrah

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I removed the case from an old iPhone and over the years the hard rubber from the case has fused to the body of the phone. I used Goo Gone and that got some of it off, but it's like when you bake gravy on to your stovetop. I don't want to use a tool on it because I'm afraid that will scratch the body of the phone. Is there a product that will remove that hardened rubber residue without damaging the body of the phone?


Denise iphone.JPG
 
Not sure but when I queried chatgpt, it returned these results:

Removing case residue from the back of an aluminum iPhone can be done effectively with a few household items:

1. **Warm, Soapy Water**: Mix a small amount of mild dish soap with warm water. Dip a soft cloth or sponge into the soapy water and gently scrub the back of the iPhone where the residue is located. Avoid getting excess water into the ports or openings of the phone.

2. **Rubbing Alcohol**: Isopropyl alcohol can help dissolve and remove sticky residue. Dampen a cloth or cotton swab with rubbing alcohol and gently rub the residue until it lifts off. Be cautious not to use too much alcohol, as it can potentially damage the finish of the aluminum.

3. **Adhesive Remover**: If the residue is particularly stubborn, you can try using a commercial adhesive remover. Apply a small amount to a cloth or cotton swab and gently rub the residue until it dissolves. Make sure to follow the product instructions and test it on a small, inconspicuous area of the phone first to ensure compatibility.

4. **Baking Soda Paste**: Mix baking soda with a small amount of water to create a paste. Apply the paste to the residue and let it sit for a few minutes before gently scrubbing with a soft cloth. The mild abrasive nature of baking soda can help lift off the residue without scratching the aluminum.

5. **Goo Gone or WD-40**: These products are designed to remove sticky residues and can be effective on aluminum surfaces. Apply a small amount to a cloth or cotton swab and gently rub the residue until it comes off. Again, test on a small area first to ensure compatibility and wipe off any excess product afterward.

After using any of these methods, wipe the back of the iPhone with a clean, damp cloth to remove any remaining residue or cleaning product. Ensure the phone is completely dry before reattaching a case or exposing it to moisture.


If the residue left behind by the fused case is particularly stubborn, you may need to employ more intensive methods to remove it. Here's how you can tackle it:

1. **Rubbing Alcohol**: Isopropyl alcohol is effective at breaking down adhesive residues. Dampen a cloth or cotton swab with rubbing alcohol and gently rub the stain until it begins to lift. Avoid using excessive amounts of alcohol, as it can potentially damage the aluminum finish. Always test on a small, inconspicuous area first.

2. **Adhesive Remover**: Consider using a commercial adhesive remover specifically designed for electronics. Apply a small amount to a cloth or cotton swab and gently rub the stain until it dissolves. Follow the product instructions carefully and test it on a small area first to ensure compatibility with the aluminum surface.

3. **Baking Soda Paste**: Create a paste using baking soda and a small amount of water. Apply the paste to the stain and let it sit for a few minutes to penetrate the residue. Then, gently scrub the area with a soft cloth. The mild abrasive nature of baking soda can help lift the stain without scratching the aluminum.

4. **Heat**: Heat can sometimes soften adhesive residues, making them easier to remove. Use a hairdryer on a low setting to gently warm the area with the stain. Once warmed, try wiping away the residue with a cloth or cotton swab.

5. **Fine-grit Sandpaper (as a last resort)**: If the stain is still persistent, you can try using very fine-grit sandpaper. Use it with extreme caution and only as a last resort. Lightly sand the stained area in a circular motion until the residue is removed. Be careful not to apply too much pressure or sand for too long, as this can damage the aluminum finish.
 
Rubbing alcohol, WD-40, Goo Gone are effective at removing adhesive residue. For rubber residue, those chemicals aren't effective. Try heat from a hair dryer to soften the rubber residue, then scrape it with a scrapper made out of plastic, or a credit card. If the back of the iPhone is glass or hard ceramic which is harder than plastic, then it should not get scratched.
 
Looks like an iPhone 6s. I have one too. I usually keep my iPhones in a clear TPU case and that keeps them in good shape with no residue. Though the case itself usually gets very yellow over time I guess from reacting to uv light and heat.


IMG_0548.JPEG
 
Some of the suggestions along with a magic eraser ?
 
i have had good luck cleaning aluminum macbooks with residue looking similar to that using clorox disinfecting wipes

cleaning all sort of electronics i always try alcohol first and than the disinfecting wipes are my next attempt. DO NOT use either on the glass screen though. for hard to remove stickers heat from a hairdryer helps a lot.
 
There's also some info here about the cleaning products you can use on various Apple devices according to Apple.

This is specific for the iPhone.
 
When all else fails, you can always use a sandblaster.
 
Many thanks to all who replied with your suggestions. (Well, um, I'm not sure about the sandblaster recommendation. But thanks nonetheless. :LOL:)

As I thought about my own baked-on-gravy comparison, I wondered if stovetop cleaner would work. And look at the results!

iphone clean case.JPG
 
Many thanks to all who replied with your suggestions. (Well, um, I'm not sure about the sandblaster recommendation. But thanks nonetheless. :LOL:)

As I thought about my own baked-on-gravy comparison, I wondered if stovetop cleaner would work. And look at the results!

View attachment 174869

Did you use like Easy Off or something?
 
Of course, my sandblasting comment was meant as a joke. In all seriousness another suggestion for others is that you may be able to cover such stains with a soft case/cover without increasing the phone size significantly. From the photos, it looks like you cleaned it up pretty well.
 
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